UC Berkeley students mentor future engineers

From The University of California at Berkeley -

About 300 Bay Area high school students gathered at UC Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science over the weekend to pit the robots they had built against one another. The 2016 PiE Robotics Competition Game was hosted by Pioneers of Engineering (PiE), a Berkeley student mentorship program that promotes STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) education among kids who are underrepresented in the field or are underprivileged.

PiE was established at Berkeley in 2009, and began by serving six partner high schools. The program now involves 25 high schools and almost 100 Berkeley student mentors. Mentors travel as far as Hayward and South San Francisco twice a week to mentor their teams. For the last three years, PiE alumni have administered a scholarship program to help support the participants’ higher education in STEM. Twenty-six professionals in STEM fields also volunteered their time as judges for the robotics competition.

The University of Chicago: Inquiry and Impact

From The University of Chicago -

Imagine yourself studying in a program with a rare combination of a vibrant intellectual climate that attracts the most talented scholars from all backgrounds, an empowering liberal arts education exemplified in our singular Core curriculum, and a campus environment that offers students the guidance and practical experience to succeed in any career they choose. Philanthropy will play a vital role in fueling this combination and preparing the brightest minds to go into the world and enrich human life through their work. UC will ensure that the best students can attend the College regardless of economic circumstances.

Johns Hopkins University undergrads' device could save billons in health care costs

Team Aezon -- composed entirely of Johns Hopkins undergrads -- is a top 10 finalist for the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, a $10 million global competition to develop a portable, medical diagnostic device for the consumer market, inspired by the “tricorder” used on Star Trek. This device could help reduce the estimated $38 million wasted annually in unnecessary emergency department visits, says Kenney Scholar Ryan Walter, Engr '16, who cites research from the New England Healthcare Institute and Truven Health Analytics.

Ariel Helms: Searching for a diabetes discovery

From Vanderbilt University -

For Ariel Helms, a genealogy search when she was young revealed a long-kept secret: Her ancestors were Cherokee Native Americans. “My great-grandparents had taken this knowledge to the grave,” she said. “My dad grew up thinking he was of German heritage. It was, at the time, a difficult thing to be Native American, so it was kept very secret.” Having a Native American background began to make sense—it could be why so many family members suffered from diabetes. These bits of information motivated Helms to seek out scientific research and Vanderbilt. She has worked in the Vanderbilt Diabetes Center’s lab the past two years. “My ultimate dream is to contribute to the alleviation of the burden of disease in a way that benefits my Native American community and the nation as a whole,” she said. “I want to help people struggling with diabetes.”

West Virginia University - Teenage Radio Wave Hunters

In southern West Virginia, a gigantic telescope stands against the backdrop of the mountains. Over the last few years, several hundred students across the country have learned at the feet of the Green Bank Telescope. Some will become scientists, and others will love science while pursuing their dreams. They're all teenage radio wave hunters searching for pulsars as part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, a program of West Virginia University and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W.Va.